The 2015 James Reaney Memorial Lecture with Thomas Gerry

The 2015 James Reaney Memorial Lecture with Thomas Gerry

Thank you all for coming to the Stratford Public Library on Sunday October 18 to hear Thomas Gerry speak on “Theatrical Features of James Reaney’s Emblem Poems”. Professor Gerry focused in particular on the metaphor of perspective in James Reaney’s “Egypt” emblem poem.

“When we were taught [as children] to draw railway tracks as meeting at a point, our world views shrank and were subjected to artificial limits. This analysis of perspective explains for readers of  Reaney’s emblems a good deal about the emblems’ style. They require their readers to ‘make a visionary correction’, and to see the world, in Blake‘s word, as ‘infinite’. — Thomas Gerry in The Emblems of James Reaney, page 73.

“Egypt” by James Reaney. First published in Poetry (Chicago) 115.3, December 1969.

“Egypt” by James Reaney. First published in Poetry (Chicago) 115.3, December 1969.

Professor Gerry explained the tradition of the emblem poem in literature and its use of allegorical meaning to rouse the faculties. He also compared the pyramid structure from “Egypt” to the “family tree pyramid” poem that appears in James Reaney’s play Colours in the Dark:

It takes
Two parents
Four Grandparents
Eight Great grandparents
Sixteen Great great grandparents
Thirty-two Great great great grandparents
Sixty-four Great great great great grandparents
One hundred and twenty-eight Great great great great great grandparents
Two hundred and fifty-six Great great great great great great grandparents
Five hundred and twelve Great great great great great great great grandparents
One thousand and twenty-four Great great great great great great great great grandparents

  He then led us in performing the poem and explained how “the pyramid shape recurs as an emblematic feature of the play” (The Emblems of James Reaney, page 84).

October 18, 2015, Stratford Public Library Auditorium (1)

October 18, 2015, Stratford Public Library Auditorium (1)

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October 18, 2015, Stratford Public Library Auditorium (2)

Thank you, Thomas Gerry, for your spirited lecture, and thank you also to the staff of the Stratford Public Library — Sally Hengeveld, Julia Merritt, Krista Robinson, and Robyn Godfrey for your support of this event.

October 18, 2015 -- Susan Reaney, Susan Wallace, Thomas Gerry, and James Stewart Reaney (photo by Elizabeth Reaney)

October 18, 2015 — Susan Reaney, Susan Wallace, Thomas Gerry, and James Stewart Reaney (Photo by Elizabeth Reaney)

♦&◊◊&♦

Next year’s speaker will be John Beckwith, composer, who collaborated with James Reaney on many musical works. The annual lecture is a project developed by The Stratford Public Library and Poetry Stratford, and features a talk by a person who is knowledgeable about the life and work of Stratford poet and playwright James Reaney and of writing in the Southwestern Ontario region, which is such a strong element in Reaney’s writing.

Here are photographs from our happy afternoon near Stratford, courtesy Elizabeth Reaney:

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Thomas Gerry on The Emblems of  James Reaney — October 18 in Stratford

Thomas Gerry on The Emblems of James Reaney — October 18 in Stratford

The Emblems of James Reaney by Thomas Gerry (2013). Published by The Porcupine's Quill.

The Emblems of James Reaney by Thomas Gerry (2013). Published by The Porcupine’s Quill.

Join us on Sunday, October 18 at 2:30 pm at The Stratford Public Library Auditorium in Stratford, Ontario, for a talk by Thomas Gerry on his new book The Emblems of James Reaney.

Former doctoral student of James Reaney’s and now professor of literature at Laurentian University, Thomas Gerry explores the history of the literary emblem, and explains the meanings behind ten of James Reaney’s emblem poems.

“The Tree” and “The Riddle” are two of Reaney’s emblem poems featured in The Emblems of James Reaney:

"The Riddle" by James Reaney. First published in Armadillo 2 1970.

“The Riddle” by James Reaney. First published in Armadillo 2 1970.

"The Tree" by James Reaney. First published in Poetry (Chicago) 115.3, December 1969.

“The Tree” by James Reaney. First published in Poetry (Chicago) 115.3, December 1969.

The Stratford Public Library is located at

19 St. Andrew Street,

Stratford, Ontario

N5A 1A2.

 

The Emblems of James Reaney is available from The Porcupine’s Quill.

The annual lecture is a project developed by The Stratford Public Library and Poetry Stratford, and features a talk by a person who is knowledgeable about the life and work of Stratford poet and playwright James Reaney and of writing in the Southwestern Ontario region, which is such a strong element in Reaney’s writing.

Composer John Beckwith’s music at the Canadian Music Centre

Composer John Beckwith’s music at the Canadian Music Centre

JBCMC

James Reaney was fortunate to have composer John Beckwith set many of his poems to music: The Great Lakes Suite, A Message to Winnipeg, and Twelve Letters to a Small Town. Beckwith and Reaney also collaborated on longer operas Night-blooming Cereus, The Shivaree, and Crazy to Kill.

To listen to original recordings of Beckwith-Reaney works, visit the Canadian Music Centre‘s Composer Showcase and  set up an account – it’s free!

James Reaney and John Beckwith, Summer 2003, in London, Ontario. Photo by Colleen Reaney.

James Reaney and John Beckwith, Summer 2003, in London, Ontario. Photo by Colleen Reaney.

 

Note from Susan Reaney: In his new memoir, Unheard Of: Memoirs of a Canadian Composer,  John Beckwith recalls his career as a composer, including his collaborations with James Reaney. The book is available from Wilfrid Laurier University Press.

James Reaney’s “The Fan”

James Reaney’s “The Fan”

July 1985, A lesson with the whetstone. James Reaney on the far right with Katelynd Chamberlin Franken (middle) and Collen Reaney (left), on the farm near Stratford, Ontario.

July 1985, A lesson with the whetstone. James Reaney on the far right with Katelynd Chamberlin Franken (middle) and Colleen Reaney (left), on the farm near Stratford, Ontario. Photo courtesy Wilma McCaig.

The Fan

A girl spent all day pleating a fan.
Either we have Verdun & Kursk
Or we have herbivorous people
As the she above
Who spend all day in their garden
Watching butterflies or playing with a kite
Or cutting out coloured paper
For a fan
Or a kite
Or balancing the reds of zinnias with those of amaranths,
For example that plant called Love Lies Bleeding.

 I saw a field of men playing football
With a criminal’s head.
I saw a field of sunflowers wiped out
By ten thousand tanks.
I saw Aunt Marjorie’s paint brush
Destroy a knight in armour
And even a villainous peasant!
I saw our hockey player break a Russian player’s ankle!

 And I saw the Fan! giant in the sky
Huge, winnowing!
I saw an armoured car drive up
To arrest an artist
Who was accounted hopelessly a- and un-political
Because he painted nothing but flowers & mice,
But of course was suddenly seen
As the most dangerous rebel in the republic.
And I saw the Fan — big, winnowing,
Make a rhapsody of a windy day,
Separate wheat from straw just like that,
And blow giants & battlefields like dead leaves away!

 James Reaney, 2005

James Reaney, age 1, with his father, James Nexbitt Reaney. Photo by Elizabeth Crerar Reaney, 1927..

James Reaney (age 8 months) with his father, James Nesbitt Reaney, Spring 1927.

 

“The Fan” is from James Reaney’s book of poems Souwesto Home,

available from Brick Books.

SouwestoHome

Goodbye to the Farm

Goodbye to the Farm

August 2010 -- James Reaney's birthplace and childhood home near Stratford, Ontario.

August 2010 — James Reaney’s birthplace and childhood home near Stratford, Ontario.

August 15, 2015 — a sad day — we learned that the old farmhouse where James Reaney was born has been torn down. Our thanks to Laura Cudworth of The Stratford Beacon Herald for covering the story: http://www.stratfordbeaconherald.com/2015/08/22/the-childhood-home-of-renowned-south-easthope-author-james-reaney-has-been-torn-down

Fondly remembered by the Reaney, Cooke, and Chamberlin Franken families, here are photos of the farm as it was. If you remember the farm and have a photo to share, please get in touch.

 

Summer 1937 -- teh reaney farmhouse and the old barnyard (Photo by Elizabeth Crearar Reaney)

Summer 1937 — The Reaney farmhouse and the old barnyard.  The original barn was built in 1869, and the house was built in 1875.

Summer 1937 -- James Reaney's cousin Kathy Smith by the front garden (ECR)

Summer 1937 — James Reaney’s cousin Kathy Smith by the front garden.

ge 4) with his cousins, Elsie, Kathleen, and Mary, Summer 1930 near Stratford, Ontario.

Elsie, Kathleen, and Mary Smith with their cousin James Reaney (age 4) at the farm, Summer 1930.

James Reaney in the garden at the farm, July 1985 (Photo by Wilma McCaig).

James Reaney in the garden at the farm, July 1985. (Photo by Wilma McCaig)

 

Jillian Keiley’s Alice Through the Looking-Glass moves across Canada

Alice Through the Looking-Glass director Jillian Keiley with actors playing Alice across Canada: Gwendolyn Collins (Winnipeg’s Royal Manitoba Theatre Centre), Ellie Heath (Edmonton’s Citadel Theatre), Trish Lindström (the Stratford Festival) and, seated, Natasha Greenblatt (NAC and Charlottetown's Confederation Centre of the Arts). Photographed in the Palm Room of Spadina House, Toronto, June 2015.

Alice Through the Looking-Glass director Jillian Keiley with actors playing Alice across Canada: Gwendolyn Collins (Winnipeg’s Royal Manitoba Theatre Centre), Ellie Heath (Edmonton’s Citadel Theatre), Trish Lindström (the Stratford Festival) and, seated, Natasha Greenblatt (NAC and Charlottetown’s Confederation Centre of the Arts). Photographed in the Palm Room of Spadina House, Toronto, June 2015.

 

June 25, 2015 — Now playing in Charlottetown at the Confederation Centre of the Arts, James Reaney’s adaptation of Lewis Carroll’s Alice Through the Looking-Glass will open in Winnipeg later this fall and in Edmonton next February. Director Jillian Keiley plans to have local performers for each production to bring last summer’s Stratford Festival hit to new cities.

In other news, Jillian Keiley will continue in her role as Artistic Director of Canada’s National Arts Centre English Theatre; her contract has been extended for another four years. Congratulations, Jillian!

 In Charlottetown, you can purchase tickets by calling 1-800-565-0278 (902-566-1267) or order online here.

♦ We also hear good things about Evangeline, a new musical play at the Charlottetown Festival, and you won’t want to miss Anne of Green Gables.

 ♦ What reviewers are saying: Alice Through the Looking-Glass” will leave you in awe. — Lennie MacPherson in The Guardian
“… S
urprises in every scene and you just have to see it for yourself.” — Cindy Lapeña in Opening Night Reviews PEI

These photographs are from a happy visit to the Charlottetown Festival and the Atlantic Canada premiere of Alice Through the Looking-Glass, courtesy Elizabeth Reaney:

June 24, 2015 -- The Confederation Centre for the Arts, Charlottetown, PEI.

June 26, 2015 — The Confederation Centre of the Arts, Charlottetown, PEI

 

The Alices lead the way to Alice Through the Looking-Glass, Charlottetown, PEI

The Alices lead the way to Alice Through the Looking-Glass, Charlottetown, PEI

June 24, 2015: Alice Through the Looking-Glass premiere, Charlottetown, PEI

June 26, 2015: Alice Through the Looking-Glass premiere, Charlottetown, PEI

Alice Through the Looking-Glass at the Charlottetown Festival, June 24, 2015

Alice Through the Looking-Glass at the Charlottetown Festival, June 26, 2015

Alice Through the Looking-Glass in Charlottetown: June 24 to August 29

This summer the Charlottetown Festival will present James Reaney’s adaptation of Lewis Carroll’s Alice Through the Looking-Glass at the Homburg Theatre at the Confederation Centre for the Arts in Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island.

This production of Alice is the Atlantic Canada premiere of last summer’s  Stratford Festival hit. How fitting that Alice would journey to PEI — the home of Anne of Green Gables! Long ago Mark Twain called Anne Shirley “the dearest and most lovable child in fiction since the immortal Alice.”

To purchase tickets, call 1-800-565-0278 (902-566-1267) or order online here.

AlicePEI

Alice Through the Looking-Glass at the Charlottetown Festival, June 24-August 29

 

Trish Lindstrom as Alice in Alice Through the Looking-Glass, May 2014; Ruby Joy is the Alice Double. Photo by Cylia Von Tiedemann.

Trish Lindstrom as Alice in Alice Through the Looking-Glass, May 2014 at the Stratford Festival. Photo by Cylia Von Tiedemann.

ATTLGcover

Lewis Carroll’s Alice Through the Looking-Glass: adapted for the stage by James Reaney is available from the Porcupine’s Quill.

Southern Ontario Gothic and James Reaney

June 4, 2015 — Southern Ontario Gothic was the topic of discussion on TV Ontario’s “Agenda” tonight. Panelists Jane Urqhart, Monika Lee, Michael Hurley, and Shani Mootoo recommend these titles for your Gothic fiction fix:

♦ Jane Urqhart: Fifth Business by Robertson Davies
♦ Monika Lee: The Donnellys by James Reaney
♦ Michael Hurley: Perpetual Motion by Graeme Gibson
♦ Shani Mootoo: All the Broken Things by Kathryn Kuitenbrouwer

James Reaney is one of our best Gothic writers from Southern Ontario, and he is one of the most influential. He’s had a huge impact on a lot of writers who are more famous than he is, like Alice Munro and Margret Atwood,” says Monika Lee, Professor of English Literature at Brescia College.

June 3, 2015 -- Monika Lee champions James Reaney's The Donnellys as a true Southern Ontario Gothic work. TV Ontario: http://tvo.org/video/213864/southern-ontario-gothic

June 4, 2015 — Monika Lee champions James Reaney’s The Donnellys as a true Southern Ontario Gothic work. TV Ontario: http://tvo.org/programs/the-agenda-with-steve-paikin/southern-ontario-gothic

 

 More about Southern Ontario Gothic:

“James Reaney’s plays — Colours in the Dark (1969), Baldoon (1976), and The Donnellys (1974-7) — as well as his short stories “The Bully” and “The Box Social” (reprinted in The Box Social and Other Stories in 1996), also assume Gothic elements of the macabre rooted in nightmarish families and uncanny action. […]

What makes this locale so prone to Gothic tales is the failure of communication between family members or social groups. In the absence of communication, strange projections and psychological grotesqueries spring up and rapidly grow to unmanageable proportions. Malevolent fantasies are the source and sustenance of the Gothic tradition.”
Michael Hurley and Allan Hepburn in The Concise Oxford Companion to Canadian Literature, pages 593-594. William Toye, Ed., Oxford University Press, 2011.

Watch the video here: >>>

 

James Reaney’s “The Crow”

The Crow

A fool once caught a crow
That flew too near even for his stone’s throw.
Alone beneath a tree
He examined the black flier
And found upon its sides
Two little black doors.
He opened both of them.
He expected to see into
Perhaps a little kitchen
With a stove, a chair,
A table and a dish
Upon that table.
But he only learned that crows
Know a better use for doors than to close
And open, and close and open
Into dreary, dull rooms.

 James Reaney, 1949

Crow near Jericho Beach, Vancouver, BC.

Crow near Jericho Beach, Vancouver, BC.

“The Crow” is from The Red Heart (1949), James Reaney‘s first collection of poems.

© 2016 James Reaney